Difference between revisions of "Mixing your track"

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== Mix trick 1: Start with the bass ==
 
== Mix trick 1: Start with the bass ==
One of the obsticles sometimes encountered, is when people get a rather "thin" sound. This can happen in many ways, but one of the possible reasons is that when you throw in some samples (.wav files) into Buzz, they are typically [[normalized]]. This means that not just a loud bassdrum, but even a small hihat will be hitting the maximum volume by default. This is unrealistic compared to the sound coming from a real set of drums. Also, high frequency audio carries a less "energy" than low frequencies, making a properly adjusted hihat appear lower than a properly adjusted bassdrum, when looking at the output level meter.
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One of the obsticles sometimes encountered, is when people get a rather "thin" sound. This can happen in many ways, but one of the possible reasons is that when you throw in some samples (.wav files) into Buzz, they are typically [[normalized]]. This means that not just a loud bassdrum, but even a small hihat will be hitting the maximum volume by default. This is unrealistic compared to the sound coming from a real set of drums. Also, high frequency audio carries a less "energy" than low frequencies, making a properly adjusted hihat appear lower than a properly adjusted bassdrum, when looking at the output level meter. Here's how you fight the problem:
  
==== Here's how you fight the problem: ====
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=== Step 1 ===
Start by turning down all instrument to a near silent level. This trick basically involves starting with the stuff that has a lot of bass (bassdrums, bass lines etc.) and making them go up to appx. -3 dB. Then you start raising the volume of anything else that is supposed to be loud. Notice the balance between the bass that is already there, and the new instrument you turn up. The balance has to be sensible. Then start adding all the last things you left out. Still, compare these with the already playing tracks in order to keep the mix well balanced.
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Mute all instruments except fhe first one. Make it sound as good as posible. Try not to use more effects than necessary. Try to bring out what is unique to this specific instrument. For a hihat, make sure it's bright and clear. For a bassdrum make sure it's fat and rich sounding. When done, mute this instrument and proceed with the next one. When all are done, enable all instruments but turn their volumes all the way down.
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=== Step 2 ===
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This part basically involves starting with the stuff that has a lot of bass (bassdrums, bass lines etc.) and making them go up to appx. -3 dB. Make sure the bass and the bassdrum (or whatever deep stuff you have at this phase) work well together. Slightly EQ'ing these few elements can make them combine without making a muddy sound. Sometimes it even helps flipping the phase of one of these deep instruments.
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Then you start raising the volume of anything else that is supposed to be loud. Notice the balance between the bass that is already there, and the new instrument you turn up. The balance has to be sensible. Then start adding all the last things you left out. Still, compare these with the already playing tracks in order to keep the mix well balanced.
  
 
[[Category:Production]]
 
[[Category:Production]]

Revision as of 12:20, 26 July 2009

Many people trying Buzz for the first time often find it hard to obtain a rich and profesionally sounding result from Buzz. There has been countless discussions on the subject, and the over-all conensus seems to be that the technical quality of Buzz' mixing engine itself is indeed sufficient to produce well sounding music. In this article we will try to outline some of the techniques you can use to obtain a harmonic mix.

Mix trick 1: Start with the bass

One of the obsticles sometimes encountered, is when people get a rather "thin" sound. This can happen in many ways, but one of the possible reasons is that when you throw in some samples (.wav files) into Buzz, they are typically normalized. This means that not just a loud bassdrum, but even a small hihat will be hitting the maximum volume by default. This is unrealistic compared to the sound coming from a real set of drums. Also, high frequency audio carries a less "energy" than low frequencies, making a properly adjusted hihat appear lower than a properly adjusted bassdrum, when looking at the output level meter. Here's how you fight the problem:

Step 1

Mute all instruments except fhe first one. Make it sound as good as posible. Try not to use more effects than necessary. Try to bring out what is unique to this specific instrument. For a hihat, make sure it's bright and clear. For a bassdrum make sure it's fat and rich sounding. When done, mute this instrument and proceed with the next one. When all are done, enable all instruments but turn their volumes all the way down.

Step 2

This part basically involves starting with the stuff that has a lot of bass (bassdrums, bass lines etc.) and making them go up to appx. -3 dB. Make sure the bass and the bassdrum (or whatever deep stuff you have at this phase) work well together. Slightly EQ'ing these few elements can make them combine without making a muddy sound. Sometimes it even helps flipping the phase of one of these deep instruments.

Then you start raising the volume of anything else that is supposed to be loud. Notice the balance between the bass that is already there, and the new instrument you turn up. The balance has to be sensible. Then start adding all the last things you left out. Still, compare these with the already playing tracks in order to keep the mix well balanced.