Difference between revisions of "Mastering"

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(Created page with 'Cleaning the mix How to tear frequencies apart using parametric equalizers.')
 
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[[Cleaning the mix]] How to tear frequencies apart using parametric equalizers.
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Mastering is the process of preparing one or multiple tracks for being transfered to a certain kind of media such as CD, LP or tape. Typical steps in mastering an album typically involves the following steps:
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* Editing out little mistakes
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* Removing noise and clicks if any
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* Checking for and removing unwanted subsonics
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* Checking the stereo width according to the destination media
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* Arranging the track in their proper order
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* Cross-fading between tracks or making the proper pauses between them
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* Adding reverb, exciters, vitalizers
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* Equalizing the tracks so that they match each other
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* Making the tracks appear to be the same volume
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* Compression
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* Limiting or saturating to bring up the global volume
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Proper mastering usually also involves in listening to various types of speakers. For certain kinds of music, you even have to consider the target audience and listen to the music in car stereos while driving, mobile phones or similar, depending on the music genre and the typical behavior of a typical consumer.
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== Media dependant rules ==
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Various output media has various rules. LPs require the lower frequencies to be mono. Analog tape typically adds white noise, and adding a bit of extra treble to a dark mix often helps fighting it. CD and mp3 are somewhat easier to deal with as they are digital. Audio that is to be broadcast over radio or TV should be mono compatible.

Revision as of 18:51, 23 July 2009

Mastering is the process of preparing one or multiple tracks for being transfered to a certain kind of media such as CD, LP or tape. Typical steps in mastering an album typically involves the following steps:

  • Editing out little mistakes
  • Removing noise and clicks if any
  • Checking for and removing unwanted subsonics
  • Checking the stereo width according to the destination media
  • Arranging the track in their proper order
  • Cross-fading between tracks or making the proper pauses between them
  • Adding reverb, exciters, vitalizers
  • Equalizing the tracks so that they match each other
  • Making the tracks appear to be the same volume
  • Compression
  • Limiting or saturating to bring up the global volume

Proper mastering usually also involves in listening to various types of speakers. For certain kinds of music, you even have to consider the target audience and listen to the music in car stereos while driving, mobile phones or similar, depending on the music genre and the typical behavior of a typical consumer.

Media dependant rules

Various output media has various rules. LPs require the lower frequencies to be mono. Analog tape typically adds white noise, and adding a bit of extra treble to a dark mix often helps fighting it. CD and mp3 are somewhat easier to deal with as they are digital. Audio that is to be broadcast over radio or TV should be mono compatible.